Terre Haute Living July/August 2012 : Page 15

Louise’s Italian Fine Dining 581 South Airport Street (812) 877-6777 Louise’s Pizzeria Cafe 727 Wabash Ave. (812) 917-5000 The Copper Bar, 810 Wabash Ave., (812) 238-0033 • thecopperbar.com Rob Lundstrom A s a child, Rob Lundstrom’s family would go out to local Italian restaurant Louise’s to celebrate special occasions and through these memories Rob and his brother Rick formed a strong at-tachment with the place, a Terre Haute dining tradition since 1939. Years later, in 2001, the brothers bought the restaurant. In 2006, they opened The Copper Bar in Downtown Terre Haute and started a new legacy of their own to complement Louise’s. When Rick passed away in 2008, Rob expanded his role in operating the family businesses. Be-tween his brother’s passing, the epicurean legacy of Louise’s, and the history that resides within The Copper Bar, Rob says “I am fortunate that I’ve known the feeling of co-creating something new with The Copper Bar while also serving as the caretaker for the Louise’s legacy which was established through the efforts of others over many decades.” Louise’s original foundress, Louise Ambrosini, would agree that he has been a dedicated one. Upon the restaurant’s opening in the 1930s, the recipes used were ones belonging to Ambrosini’s mother in Vi-cenza, Italy, and they were made fresh upon ordering. Rob has faith-fully maintained that tradition today. With Louise’s located in Terre Haute International Airport’s Hulman Field terminal building and Louise’s Pizzeria located in the Terre Haute Children’s Museum, Rob is working hard to maintain and spread the legacy founded by Louise Am-brosini and carried forward by Armen and Betty Gottardi as part of Louise’s extended family. Louise’s isn’t the only Lundstrom-owned joint where customers can enjoy a side of history with their meal. The Copper Bar building, lo-cated downtown at 810 Wabash Avenue, was originally built in 1895 and has held several identities before becoming The Copper Bar. For a large part of its history in the 1900s, the property was operated as “The Office Bar” (“Honey, I need to work late at the Office.”), and after going through several incarnations after The Office Bar which focused more on restaurant operations, Lundstrom says affectionately that the building has come full circle back to its base roots. “It loves being a bar and feeling the cheer of people having a good time.” That isn’t even the most interesting piece of local history. The Cop-per Bar’s namesake copper-plated bar was relocated from the leg-endary Terre Haute House Marine Room as part of the downtown revitalization that was energized from the development of the Hilton Garden Inn. It was installed as the main downstairs bar – along with the seat that used to be occupied by none other than Terre Haute House regular John Dillinger when he was in town during Terre Haute’s heyday. But that isn’t what Lundstrom views to be most dis-tinctive about The Copper Bar. “I believe our most unique hallmark is our atmosphere where people of all backgrounds and ages can blend together without feeling out of place around each other. We’re a bit of a chameleon bar as our clientele changes from downtown profession-als in early evening and grows younger as the night goes on.” Continuing a rich history with Louise’s and The Copper Bar. With a commitment to preserving the heritages of his businesses, as well as a desire to assist in the efforts to revitalize the downtown area, Rob Lundstrom has become a true driving force in this community. With several local businesses that exemplify the kind of high expecta-tions he has for Terre Haute’s future, these are two restaurants that are not to be missed. BUSINESS VISIONARIES A SPECIAL ADVERTISING FEATURE terrehauteliving.com July -August 2012 | Terre Haute Living 15

Rob Lundstrom

Continuing a rich history with Louise’s and The Copper Bar.<br /> <br /> As a child, Rob Lundstrom’s family would go out to local Italian restaurant Louise’s to celebrate special occasions and through these memories Rob and his brother Rick formed a strong attachment with the place, a Terre Haute dining tradition since 1939. Years later, in 2001, the brothers bought the restaurant. In 2006, they opened The Copper Bar in Downtown Terre Haute and started a new legacy of their own to complement Louise’s. When Rick passed away in 2008, Rob expanded his role in operating the family businesses. Between his brother’s passing, the epicurean legacy of Louise’s, and the history that resides within The Copper Bar, Rob says “I am fortunate that I’ve known the feeling of co-creating something new with The Copper Bar while also serving as the caretaker for the Louise’s legacy which was established through the efforts of others over many decades.”<br /> <br /> Louise’s original foundress, Louise Ambrosini, would agree that he has been a dedicated one. Upon the restaurant’s opening in the 1930s, the recipes used were ones belonging to Ambrosini’s mother in Vicenza, Italy, and they were made fresh upon ordering. Rob has faithfully maintained that tradition today. With Louise’s located in Terre Haute International Airport’s Hulman Field terminal building and Louise’s Pizzeria located in the Terre Haute Children’s Museum, Rob is working hard to maintain and spread the legacy founded by Louise Ambrosini and carried forward by Armen and Betty Gottardi as part of Louise’s extended family.<br /> <br /> Louise’s isn’t the only Lundstrom-owned joint where customers can enjoy a side of history with their meal. The Copper Bar building, located downtown at 810 Wabash Avenue, was originally built in 1895 and has held several identities before becoming The Copper Bar. For a large part of its history in the 1900s, the property was operated as “The Office Bar” (“Honey, I need to work late at the Office.”), and after going through several incarnations after The Office Bar which focused more on restaurant operations, Lundstrom says affectionately that the building has come full circle back to its base roots. “It loves being a bar and feeling the cheer of people having a good time.”<br /> <br /> That isn’t even the most interesting piece of local history. The Copper Bar’s namesake copper-plated bar was relocated from the legendary Terre Haute House Marine Room as part of the downtown revitalization that was energized from the development of the Hilton Garden Inn. It was installed as the main downstairs bar – along with the seat that used to be occupied by none other than Terre Haute House regular John Dillinger when he was in town during Terre Haute’s heyday. But that isn’t what Lundstrom views to be most distinctive about The Copper Bar. “I believe our most unique hallmark is our atmosphere where people of all backgrounds and ages can blend together without feeling out of place around each other. We’re a bit of a chameleon bar as our clientele changes from downtown professionals in early evening and grows younger as the night goes on.”<br /> <br /> With a commitment to preserving the heritages of his businesses, as well as a desire to assist in the efforts to revitalize the downtown area, Rob Lundstrom has become a true driving force in this community. With several local businesses that exemplify the kind of high expectations he has for Terre Haute’s future, these are two restaurants that are not to be missed.

Previous Page  Next Page


Publication List
 

Loading